Researcher Beware – Sometimes the AncestryDNA ThruLines Are Wrong

 I obtain only a few NEW AncestryDNA thruLines lately – often one every week.  However I test every one out.  I now have about 430 of them.  

1)  I acquired a brand new one final week, with the widespread ancestors of my so-called “Potential Ancestors” fifth great-grandparents Johannes Rowe and Catherine Loescher.  The Rau/Rowe and Loescher households of New York had been Palatines from Germany and the households are within the Henry Z. Jones Palatine Families of New York ebook).

My genealogical analysis has discovered no proof that they’re the mother and father of my 4th great-grandfather, Philip Rowe (1752-1817) of Hunterdon county, New Jersey, however many on-line household bushes at Ancestry.com and different websites present Philip Jacob Row because the son of Johannes and Catherine (Loescher) Rowe (or Row or Rau or Rauh) of Dutchess County, New York.  

2)  I checked out my record of ThruLines and noticed that Johannes Wilhelmus Rowe and Catherine Loescher had a brand new descendant and a purported sixth cousin with me – however solely on the 13 cM degree.  Right here is the highest of the ThruLines chart:

You possibly can see my ThruLine by Philip Row to me on the proper, which I feel is flawed.  The ThruLine on the proper by Anna Maria Rowe might be appropriate – it has Anna Maria born in Dutchess County, New York and that line goes to Vermont and is fairly properly sourced.

The center ThruLine is the brand new one, and it goes by a Mary Ann Rowe (1760-1825).  

There are a selection of Ancestry Member Timber that embody this individual – the primary one is the one tree with an connected document.  I clicked on that tree after which on the profile for Anna Maria Row and noticed:

This Anna Maria Rowe was born in Cornwall, England, and died in Cornwall in 1825.  She had youngsters with an unknown man and had three Lamerton youngsters in Cornwall between 1792 and 1797.  The ThruLine reveals that the road to the DNA match goes by Cornwall and into Devon.  The mom of my DNA match was born in Devon in England.  My DNA match was very seemingly born in Devon, England.

3)  I famous that this particular DNA match doesn’t have a hyperlink to the Rowe/Loescher household in New York – so her tree doesn’t have the flawed connection to the colonial New York couple.  Nonetheless, AncestryDNA does have the connection due to comparable names and/or household tree(s) with an error.  That is the issue with BIG household bushes (I hold saying that Ancestry makes use of a BIG household tree that they use for ThruLines).  I famous that FamilySearch Household Tree has my Philip Row (1752-1817) of New Jersey conflated with a number of units of fogeys and a number of other spouses with youngsters additionally.  “Pobody’s nerfect” (not even me!) within the household tree world!  

What are the probabilities {that a} younger girl of German heritage born in 1760 would transfer to Cornwall in England earlier than about 1790 and marry a person and have youngsters there?  I’ll take bets at 100 to 1.  

So this AncestryDNA ThruLine is flawed in my humble opinion.  

4)  However wait – I share 13 cM in 1 section with this DNA match.  I could also be a distant cousin (that’s nominally a 4th cousin relationship), however it could be a section on a chromosome that’s widespread to many individuals of English ancestry and we aren’t actually about 4th cousins.  Sadly, my DNA match’s tree does not have many leaves on the pedigree chart so I can not simply work again to her third to sixth great-grandparents to see if we share Somerset or Wiltshire households.  My guess is that we share a Somerset household associated to my Vaux line in South Petherton, Somerset.

5)  The underside line right here is “You need to consider every ThruLine you have got for the family tree a part of it, and ask vital questions like ‘are there information that present every generational hyperlink?’ and ‘does this make sense time-wise and locality-wise?'”  

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Disclosure: I’ve a complimentary all-access subscription from Ancestry.com, for which I’m grateful. Ancestry.com has supplied materials issues for journey bills to conferences, and has hosted occasions and meals that I’ve attended in Salt Lake Metropolis, in previous years.

The URL for this publish is:  https://www.geneamusings.com/2021/05/researcher-beware-sometimes-ancestrydna.html

Copyright (c) 2021, Randall J. Seaver

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